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College Credits vs. Homeschool High School Credits

One whole college class is equivalent to one whole high school class.

Need details?

One college class is usually between 3 credits and 6 credits per class, depending on the class and the college.  Each of those college classes is equivalent to one whole high school credit.  College credits are measured differently than high school credits.  College credits don't require  you to count hours or seat time.

Not all college classes are 3-6 college credits, though.  If a class doesn't fit within that area, then high schools have some discretion on how many credits are awarded.  That means that YOU, homeschoolers, also have some discretion.  Below 3 college credits, a public school might give 1/2 high school credit, and sometimes lower, even 1/4 credit.  I usually suggest that a college class that is 3-6 credits is worth 1 high school credit.  And any college class that is 1-2 credits would get 1/2 high school credit.

 


 

Like MORE details?

You might feel more confident if you saw this it in print from a government agency.  In Washington State, for example, they spell out the public school policy very clearly here:

http://apps.leg.wa.gov/wac/default.aspx?cite=180-51-050

(2) College and university course work. At the college or university level, five quarter or three semester hours shall equal 1.0 high school credit: Provided, That for the purpose of this subsection, "college and university course work" means course work that generally is designated 100 level or above by the college or university.



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Comments 4

Guest - Julie on Wednesday, 03 October 2012 12:23

Very helpful! Would I give honors credits to a high schooler taking college classes?

Very helpful! Would I give honors credits to a high schooler taking college classes?
Guest - Lee (website) on Wednesday, 03 October 2012 12:28

You can certainly do that! If it were me, I would leave the class title the same as the college title, and not weight the grade.
Blessings,
Lee

You can certainly do that! If it were me, I would leave the class title the same as the college title, and not weight the grade. Blessings, Lee
Guest - Jennifer on Thursday, 16 October 2014 13:00

Many sources opine that, "One college class generally equals one high school credit" (even HSLDA). However, it is incumbent on us homeschoolers to investigate what the legal rules in our particular state actually are. For example, in Florida the DOE has a document that correlates the college class code with the equivalent high school credit. Sometimes the college class is worth 1 credit (e.g., science with lab), but sometimes it is only worth 1/2 credit (science without lab). It would be questionable (at least in my mind) to award more credit for a college course than the DOE has authorized. Here is the link for Florida; I'm assuming other states may have similar regulation:
http://www.fldoe.org/articulation/Default.asp (look for the Dual Enrollment Equivalency List, a pdf about half-way down the page).

Many sources opine that, "One college class generally equals one high school credit" (even HSLDA). However, it is incumbent on us homeschoolers to investigate what the legal rules in our particular state actually are. For example, in Florida the DOE has a document that correlates the college class code with the equivalent high school credit. Sometimes the college class is worth 1 credit (e.g., science with lab), but sometimes it is only worth 1/2 credit (science without lab). It would be questionable (at least in my mind) to award more credit for a college course than the DOE has authorized. Here is the link for Florida; I'm assuming other states may have similar regulation: http://www.fldoe.org/articulation/Default.asp (look for the Dual Enrollment Equivalency List, a pdf about half-way down the page).
Guest - Lee (website) on Thursday, 16 October 2014 13:04

Dear Jennifer -

You are absolutely right. It is ALWAYS prudent to check with your state's requirements. Thank you for the link!

~Laura, Assistant to The HomeScholar

Dear Jennifer - You are absolutely right. It is ALWAYS prudent to check with your state's requirements. Thank you for the link! ~Laura, Assistant to The HomeScholar
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Thursday, 19 September 2019

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