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The CLT Test Alternative to SAT or ACT

You're likely familiar with the SAT and ACT tests, but are you familiar with the CLT? I'm not always able to spend as much time as I would like discussing the CLT Test, but I want to be sure parents are aware of this new test. As more colleges accept the test, and more homeschoolers utilize a classical education, it's important for you to do research to see if the test is a good fit for your child.  

There are 5300 colleges and universities in the United states, and as of 2017, the CLT was accepted by just over 40 of those colleges. But because of it's liberal arts emphasis, and Common Core free content, the popularity of this test is growing, especially among homeschoolers. 

The CLT test is one of many high school tests. You can learn strategies, secrets, and pro tips on the ever-changing PSAT, SAT, ACT, and CLT in my free online class, "High School Testing - Simply Explained."

The CLT is unique because their goal is to test the intersection where intellect and virtue combine, rather than try to create a values-neutral test. This test was developed as a way to "opt out" of common core and focus more on classical education. Reading selections might include passages from C.S. Lewis. Logic and reasoning are included, also. And Common Core materials will not be on the test. It's particularly good for classical home educators, and students applying to multiple liberal arts and classical-leaning colleges.

The test will reinforce the connection between knowledge and virtue. Students already studying that which is good, true, and beautiful will be well prepared for the exam.

"Finally, brothers and sisters, whatever is true, whatever is noble, whatever is right, whatever is pure, whatever is lovely, whatever is admirable—if anything is excellent or praiseworthy—think about such things." ~ Philippians 4:8

Let me give you a few CLT test quick facts to get you started.

  1. CLT is an online test – not paper and pencil
  2. It is given at local testing centers with a proctor
  3. Students bring a computer - testing site only provides internet access and the proctor
  4. Test covers English: Verbal Reasoning, Reading, Grammar, Writing and Math: Quantitative Reasoning
  5. Science is not included
  6. Essay is not included
  7. It is not accepted by all colleges, so be sure it's a good fit for you and your college choices
  8. The test is 2 hours long – less than the SAT and ACT
  9. The cost is about the same as SAT and ACT
  10. They offer pre-CLT tests and test prep materials
  11. Some scholarships at some colleges are tied to the CLT

You can find current and updated information on the CLT at cltexam.com and CLT FAQ. When your time comes to do college admission tests, be sure to check out the CLT.

I recommend that students apply to 4-8 colleges, and a mix of public and private universities, in order to get the best chances of admission and scholarships that allow a student to graduate without debt. Read Three Steps to Finding a College for tips on how to get started making that list of colleges that are a good fit for your child.

It's unlikely that a student will apply to that many colleges and that they ALL accept the CLT, so be prepared with an SAT or ACT score as well. Read How to Ace the SAT or ACT: Get the best possible score with the least possible stress.

I hope this is helpful information! Has your student taken the CLT test? What was your experience with it? We'd love to know!
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Saturday, 19 October 2019

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