Search - Quix
Search - Content
Search - News Feeds
Search - Easy Blog
Search - Tags

Keeping Academic Records After Homeschool Graduation

Keeping Academic Records After Homeschool Graduation
Parents need to keep the academic  records for their teens after  graduation . They may be needed for further education in 5 years.... or 10 years... or 30 years after the children have left the nest. Graduates may need a transcript fo...
Continue reading
  1330 Hits
  0 Comments

Creating Long Course Descriptions from Co-Op Class Info

Creating-Long-Course-Descriptions-from-Co-Op-Class-Info
Did you know that you can create long course descriptions from Co-Op class info? Yep! Course descriptions describe your homeschool class that even a stranger unfamiliar with homeschooling will understand what the student has done.  Sometime...
Continue reading
  589 Hits
  0 Comments

Create Your Magnum Opus of Homeschooling

Create Your Magnum Opus of Homeschooling
Lisa wrote to share about her success with the Comprehensive Record Solution, testifying that it provided a holistic picture of her child that resulted in college admission AND admission into the nursing program at the school.  You can take my f...
Continue reading
  626 Hits
  0 Comments

How to Include Bible on a Homeschool Transcript

How to Include Bible on a Homeschool Transcript
How to give high school grades, assign credits, and make transcripts are the top questions I get from parents. Here is your free guide. Register now: A Homeschool Parents Guide to Grades Credits and Transcripts Webinar . Homeschoolers are often Chris...
Continue reading
  1758 Hits
  0 Comments

How to Create a Collage of Awesomeness [with Free Ebook]

How to Create a Collage of Awesomeness [with Free Ebook]
Including Delight Directed Learning in your homeschool is so important! It can help shape and mold the career goals of your child, lead to great experiences that can be put on the transcript, and create a fabulous resume - all while still in high sch...
Continue reading
  1335 Hits
  0 Comments

Colleges May Require, Request, or Appreciate Course Descriptions

Colleges May Require, Request, or Appreciate Course Descriptions
Most colleges require, request, or appreciate course descriptions. Most parents plan ahead, by having course descriptions ready for college admission. However, there is great variety on how to provide that information. Some colleges say they "don't n...
Continue reading
  2250 Hits
  0 Comments

3 Writing Prompts for Course Descriptions

3 Writing Prompts for Course Descriptions
3 Writing Prompts for Course Descriptions Course descriptions are a 5th grade writing assignment. It's true! We taught our 5th graders to write a descriptive paragraph, and we can learn how to do it too. And, bonus! You can earn scholarships just for...
Continue reading
  3280 Hits
  0 Comments

6 Tips for Tough Course Descriptions

6 Tips for Tough Course Descriptions
6 Tips for Tough Course Descriptions Getting course descriptions done can seem overwhelming.  But, it doesn't have to be! Follow my 6 steps listed below, and you'll be on your way to completing them in no time. 1. Cover letter can explain things...
Continue reading
  2849 Hits
  0 Comments

How to Avoid Writing Homeschool High School Course Descriptions

How to Avoid Writing Homeschool High School Course Descriptions

How to Avoid Writing Homeschool High School Course Descriptions


I’m a huge advocate of parents creating homeschool course descriptions and transcripts, and I have all sorts of great resources on my website to help even the most intimidated and overwhelmed parent do this. But I also realize that some people won’t get around to. Although many, if not most, colleges like course descriptions to accompany a homeschool student’s transcript, there are several strategies for those who simply want to avoid writing them. If you’re one of these parents, here are some suggestions for achieving college admission success without them.

Check College Requirements


One method is to search for specific colleges which don’t require course descriptions. Some colleges only have five minutes to evaluate each applicant, so they don’t have much time to look at them closely. The difficulty is that you won’t necessarily know in advance whether colleges require course descriptions or not, because sometimes they don’t publicize this information.

Outside Documentation through Tests


A second strategy is to use test scores to supplement your child's transcript. Provide outside documentation through tests, which can reinforce the grades and evaluations represented on your student’s transcript. Testing options include SAT Subject Tests, AP exams, and CLEP exams. If you don’t include thorough documentation, sometimes a college asks the student to take the GED.

Outside Documentation through Classes


A third option is to have your student take courses through a classroom situation, such as community college, online classes or distance learning - providing a transcript from a third party. Even with these outside classes, some colleges still require course descriptions, so it’s not always a perfect solution.

Community College


A fourth strategy to avoid course descriptions is what I call the “back door strategy.” This is when your student goes to community college, and later on gets their foot in the door to a 4-year university. Universities want to know that a student can handle college level work, which is why they want information on your homeschool.

Some universities will give direct admission, and some require an automatic transfer agreement with public universities if your child has an AA degree (a two-year degree) from a community college. The university may provide admission based on performance in class and with an AA degree, your child may enter as a transfer student rather than a high school senior. If a student has two years of community college and an AA when they apply for college, they may apply as a transfer student.

Fewer scholarship opportunities may be available with this method. If you’re using community college classes as a way to avoid course descriptions, make sure your child understands they need to get all A’s and B’s in order to earn college admission. Be careful, because this strategy can require a lot of hard work, but it is worth looking into.

Whatever choice you make, be sure to research the requirements of colleges you’re interested in, so you’re prepared to do what it takes to help your student earn admission!



 

 

 

Get Your Free Ebook on "Homeschool High School Excellence"
Continue reading
  829 Hits
  0 Comments

How to Write Course Descriptions - How do you learn best?

How to Write Course Descriptions - How do you learn best?

How to Write Course Descriptions - How do you learn best?


I've explained in a earlier blog post the 3 Ingredients of a Great Course Description: a paragraph about what you did, a list of what you used, and a description of how you graded. Within those suggestions, you have a LOT of latitude!

You can have a very SHORT description about your grades, and say only "1/3 tests, 1/3 lab, 1/3 daily work." Or you can be very detailed in your grading description, and provide a chart with the scores on all 23 chapter tests and all 48 biology labs. That part is up to you.

I suggest this brief little format, just to help you keep things in order.

Course Description
Subject Area (Math): Class Title (Algebra)


(Descriptive paragraph)
In this class the student will....

Continue reading
  1043 Hits
  0 Comments

Writing a Course Description for Chorus

Writing a Course Description for Chorus

Writing a Course Description for Chorus


Cindy was working on her course descriptions (go, team, go!!!) and got stuck with music class.
  I would like to count all the singing our youth group does as Choir but not sure how to write it on a course description or on the transcript. How can I best represent this in a transcript and Course description. Oh yeah, they do a drama in the performance too!

It's so common for kids who love one kind of fine art (like singing) to love LOTS of fine arts (like drama.) Choir is a GREAT fine art - that's what I took in high school, same course description for all 4 years, and I got a total of 4 credits during high school for it. I had friends in high school that took choir, band, and orchestra every single year - and earned 3 high school credits in music every single year. Feel free to put choir and drama both on your transcript.

First, read this review of the 3 Ingredients of a Great Course Description

When you get stuck, try to find a high school course description from a public school. I found a choir course description from Antigo High School in Wisconsin, a public high school, but you can pilfer wording from any school with a similar class, and then modify it to fit your needs.

TREBLE CHORUS
Grades 9 – 12
1 Credit
1 Year
No Prerequisite


The Treble Chorus is a women’s chorus that sings a variety of music. It is open to any interested female in grades 9-12. All females in the choir program will be placed into Treble Chorus their freshman year. All students with no choir experience must have a voice placement interview with the instructor before being allowed to participate. Focus will be placed on proper vocal production, sight-reading, diction, music theory, and functioning as a musical ensemble. Required concerts for the Treble Chorus include: the Fall Concert, Holiday Concert, Clinician and/or Large Group Contest, and the Spring Concert. Other performances are possible during the course of the school year. The Treble Chorus meets daily.

Continue reading
  2063 Hits
  0 Comments

How to Remember Course Description Details

How to Remember Course Description Details

How to Remember Course Description Details


Many moms feel anxious that they will not remember to include everything in the course descriptions and reading lists. Do you feel the same way? Making your comprehensive records every year is a HUGE step in the right direction. Every spring, sit yourself down and update your homeschool transcript for each child. Then, write course descriptions for each class on the transcript. You heard me. Each class.

You don't have to be a perfect mom to make this happen. Ordinary humans get this job done too, so let me show you how to do it.

First, let go of perfection - especially if you are stressing out so much you are avoiding it all together! Make it your goal to include 80% of the information about the course contents, and then maybe you will feel more comfortable. When you piecemeal things together, instead of use textbooks, it can be a lot to list, but if your goal is to write down at least 80%, then often, moms feel more comfy-cozy-secure in what they are doing.

Absolutely you want to capture the most important things, but that should be pretty easy using the "elephant strategy" that you will remember and not forget.  The big solution to  your concerns is that you take just a few easy steps to making your class descriptions:


  1. Every day, throw all your information or papers in a big box in your schoolroom, or if that doesn't work, take notes in a notebook, journal, or even a calendar!

  2. Every month or so, try to use your notes or information from those papers you saved to add to your course descriptions

  3. Every year, work on making your course descriptions look good. I suggest spring, when the bulk of the class is already done, and all of the information is fresh in your mind.


If you do it that way, you'll easily remember what you need to remember!

Keep up the good work, homeschool parents! You can do it!  Start this process and the next thing you know, you'll be creating the course descriptions and records! Start this EARLY in high school, by 9th and 10th grade, so you have plenty of time to work on this. Then just be consistent. In fact, one Gold Care Club member worked on two course descriptions per week - that was her goal. She was extremely successful through the process. If you are stuck, maybe a more bite-sized goal will help you?

How do YOU remember the details you need to put into course descriptions?  Do you have a method that you can share?

If you need more help, I have a free class to motivate you. Check it out! Homeschool Records That Open Doors..


 

Continue reading
  848 Hits
  0 Comments

Creating Course Descriptions for Classes Without a Curriculum

Creating Course Descriptions for Classes Without a Curriculum



Creating Course Descriptions for Classes Without a Curriculum


Are you working on your homeschool high school course descriptions? Creating course descriptions can be fairly straight forward when you are using a standard curriculum or textbook. It's a little more challenging when you are flying free. What do you include for classes with no textbook or formal curriculum?

Realistic Expectations

Course descriptions simply communicate the content of each class. The first step is to have realistic expectations. When looking for inspiration for course descriptions, remember that there are MANY classes in public and private schools that don't have textbooks at all. Consider a public school class in auto shop, wood shop, choir, art, and PE. Even courses such as Computer Technology or Nutrition may not use a formal curriculum in ANY school.

One way to create a course description is to find a high school with a similar class. You can read and use their course descriptions as a guide.

Technology Class Course Description Examples

  • Look at this list of course descriptions from my Alma Mater, Bellevue High school. Starting on page 17 you can read some technology class examples, including radio and TV broadcasting and graphic art. Bellevue School District Course Catalog

  • This school has a list of computer technology course descriptions, including computer applications, computer programming, and computer science classes taught in high school. Long Beach School Curriculum. As you can see, these course descriptions do NOT always include a textbook; they use a tutorial for Microsoft office along with keyboarding software. You can also check out their grading criteria, which are never based solely on a test.


Nutrition and Wellness Course Description Examples

  • This is the description of a high school class on nutrition. It explains that "Students will be assessed in a number of ways, including checklists, essays, journal reflections, quizzes, tests, demonstrations, discussions, presentations/speeches, multimedia presentations, observation, group projects, and rating scales. Points will be awarded for each activity completed. Participation points will also periodically be rewarded for participation in class discussion and activities." You can use their ideas for evaluation as your own. Your child can demonstrate or work through a recipe as a check list. That's enough to determine a grade. Read this High school Nutrition and Wellness class.

  • This class, called "Food and Nutrition," has a lovely example for evaluating a cooking class. One evaluation is "Apple Yogurt Muffins" - yummy! The description for this public school class says, "This one semester course is an introduction to food and nutrition, fitness, safety and sanitation, consumer buying skills, food storage, and food preparation skills. Lab experiences include a variety of techniques in preparing grains, fruits, vegetables, dairy products and meats. This course will enable students to realize benefits of sound nutrition and apply these principles to their daily lives." Read over this Foods and Nutrition Class. Consider writing a formal-looking, but very delicious course description that includes the words "Unit 4 Pizza Lab Evaluation."


Naming the Curriculum

You don't need to name the curriculum in each course description. Simply write "Resources Used" and describe them: Microsoft Tutorials, Khan Academy Videos, etc. List what you DO have and don't worry if it's a formal curriculum or not.

I got stuck on a music course description when I was writing up my son's. He loves playing classical piano music, but there aren't any textbooks for piano. I ultimately chose to list all his performance-ready pieces and the repertoire books he used.

Read over the examples above, think about what you DID do and use and list it. You'll be well on your way to creating course descriptions. No curriculum necessary.

Have you started creating course descriptions yet?

Continue reading
  667 Hits
  0 Comments

How to Earn $1600 an Hour Writing Course Descriptions

How to Earn $1600 an Hour Writing Course Descriptions
 


If your homeschool family is struggling to make the time to write course descriptions, this might be a good blog post to share with your spouse.

If you had the perfect job, working from home, loving your children, how much could you earn per hour, do you think? Traci found out that her job as a homeschool parent was actually earning her WELL over minimum wage. Can you believe it? $1600/hour for working on her homeschool course descriptions!
 “I just had to write to let you know that my daughter received the Regent's Scholarship for a $40,700 annual award.  I am still in shock daily. Of course this is after hours and hours of work on both of our parts, my daughter writing countless essays and filling out applications, and me writing course descriptions.  But we figured out that even if we spent 100 hours in the process, we were actually making about $1600 an hour! I cannot thank you enough for all the direction you have given me over the past few years.  Honestly, the college application process has proven to be one of the most challenging things I have ever done.  It challenged my faith and sanity.  I cannot imagine trying to do it on my own.  Thank you for choosing to spend your post-schooling years helping others! The prospect of homeschooling high school IS scary, but looking back, the blessing of intimacy I now share with my daughter by having spent these past  four years together was worth it.  Thank you for helping!

~ Sincerely, Traci Minor

Why would you share this information with your spouse? Because writing course descriptions is like changing a baby's diaper. It's a dirty job, but somebody has got to do it. If you and your beloved can just agree that course descriptions are important, and encourage one another, then maybe you can have the perfect job working from home too, and earn HUGE amounts of cold, hard cash for college.

Here are some resources to get your started!

Learn more about creating awesome course descriptions with this FREE class.

Homeschool Records That Open Doors

Continue reading
  671 Hits
  2 Comments

Capture Learning for High School Credit

Capture Learning for High School Credit
You can put FUN on your homeschool transcript! Did you know that? It's such a freeing concept! High school credits created for fun will be the easiest your child will ever earn. Your children do something for fun, you count the hours they work, and give them appropriate credit on their transcript. Easy-peasy!

Capture Learning for High School Credit




Evelyn wrote an example, so you can see how it works in real life....
I have been following your blog and newsletter for the past year. I was a Member and took your Total Transcript Solution course. We also had a phone and email consult with you regarding my 9th grade daughter, Audrey, who is very interested in the arts: drama, film, dance, creative writing, music.
I followed your advice of: delight directed learning and capturing learning for credits. The result has been amazing. Audrey is so enthusiastic about the new youth film group she has started with a fellow homeschooled teen--Fountain of Youth Productions.  Audrey has written a screen play, designed a website, learned about social media, studied film-making and editing, taken drama classes, written press releases, managed cast auditions, and created a promotional video. She recently initiated a crowd-funding campaign for their first movie project. All these activities, and more, involved skill-building in writing, business, computers, research, art, public speaking, and leadership.  Your Total Transcript Solution helped me see how to use all this on her academic record.


I think Audrey's video will inspire other parents of creative teens incorporate their passions into their high school experience and transcript.  Please feel free to share this with your blog readers.  http://www.fountainofyouthproductions.com/. Audrey introduces herself at the opening. I can't believe she made this all herself. Talk about self-directed learning!


Thank you for your support, insight, and encouragement!

~ Evelyn in Massachusetts


This description that Evelyn has provided is the basis for a wonderful course description. It's just a descriptive paragraph about what took place in the class, and that's what a course description is! Encourage your children to LOVE learning, and grab credits where you can!

What are your child's interests? Have you captured them as credit on their high school transcript yet? Please share!



Please note: This post was originally published in March 2013 and has been revamped and updated for accuracy and comprehensiveness.

Homeschooling is NOT the same as doing schoolwork at home.  There is so much freedom in homeschooling! My Gold Care Club will give you all the help you need to succeed!
Continue reading
  933 Hits
  0 Comments

More Encouraging Posts

  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
  • 6
  • 7
  • 8
  • 9
  • 10
  • 11
  • 12
  • 13
  • 14
  • 15
  • 16
  • 17
  • 18
  • 19
  • 20
  • 21
  • 22
  • 23
  • 24
  • 25
  • 26
  • 27
  • 28
  • 29
  • 30
  • 31
  • 32
  • 33
  • 34
  • 35
  • 36
  • 37
  • 38
  • 39
  • 40
  • 41
  • 42
  • 43
  • 44
  • 45
  • 46
  • 47
  • 48
  • 49
  • 50
  • 51
  • 52
  • 53
  • 54
  • 55
  • 56